2nd International e-Conference on Translation, Mediation and Accessibility for Linguistic Minorities

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Add to Calendar 2020-09-24 10:00:00 2020-09-25 10:00:00 2nd International e-Conference on Translation, Mediation and Accessibility for Linguistic Minorities In an increasingly globalised world, monolingual societies are becoming extremely rare, as states, mainly in urban areas (Meylaerts and González Núñez 2017, 5–6), present a growing linguistic diversity both in northern and southern countries (United Nations 2017, 1). Alongside autochthonous linguistic minorities, which shift between the loss of native speakers and language revalorisation or revitalisation processes, an increasing number of foreign-speaking minorities coexist who have their origin in migrations, forced migrations and refugee processes. People with disabilities, be it sensorial or cognitive, also contribute to the increase of linguistic heterogeneity and in our view represent another kind of linguistic minority, being as they are speakers of sign languages or users of texts linguistically or medially adapted. In this context, linguistic mediation activities – whether translation or interpreting – are key to the social inclusion of any kind of linguistic minority. Given that any language policy implies an explicit or implicit policy of linguistic mediation (Meylaerts 2012, 744; Meylaerts and González Núñez 2017, 3), governments at the regional, state and international level can play a decisive role in providing translation and interpreting services for different population groups. Location ELT events noreply@eltevents.com Australia/Sydney public
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In an increasingly globalised world, monolingual societies are becoming extremely rare, as states, mainly in urban areas (Meylaerts and González Núñez 2017, 5–6), present a growing linguistic diversity both in northern and southern countries (United Nations 2017, 1). Alongside autochthonous linguistic minorities, which shift between the loss of native speakers and language revalorisation or revitalisation processes, an increasing number of foreign-speaking minorities coexist who have their origin in migrations, forced migrations and refugee processes. People with disabilities, be it sensorial or cognitive, also contribute to the increase of linguistic heterogeneity and in our view represent another kind of linguistic minority, being as they are speakers of sign languages or users of texts linguistically or medially adapted.

In this context, linguistic mediation activities – whether translation or interpreting – are key to the social inclusion of any kind of linguistic minority. Given that any language policy implies an explicit or implicit policy of linguistic mediation (Meylaerts 2012, 744; Meylaerts and González Núñez 2017, 3), governments at the regional, state and international level can play a decisive role in providing translation and interpreting services for different population groups.